About Tai-Shin Do » Kata


The KATA (form), used in TAI-SHIN DO are drawn mainly from Okinawan Goju-Ryu. Two KATA have been adapted from Okinawan Shorin-Ryu or its derivative, Japanese Shotokan.

The Significance of Kata

"When you Perform Kata, the most Important thing is Mental Attitude"

Kata is the attitude of self-defense that you perform with a presumed attack in mind as well as your defense on a fixed embu-line (the line of movement of the kata), to protect yourself from a hypothetical enemy with your body that is trained well by strict practice. Which means you structure the attack from the hypothetical enemy with a meaningful and effective counterattack systematically. You perform individually with the interpretation based defense and on that theory. Moreover, the purpose of Goju-ryu kata is not only the practice of techniques but also the training of the body, as a result, you can say that kata is the expression of yourself when you learn karate.


 

Kata is Composed of these Elements:

1. The Manner of Rei (bow)

2. The direction of embu-line (pattern of movement)

3. The combinations of Techniques

4. The uses of attack, defense and postures

5. The strength and speed of techniques

6. Kiai (shout) and Kihaku (projecting the Spirit)

7. Gathering one's thoughts

8. The strength and speed of whole kata

9. Introduction, development, turn and conclusion

10. How to breathe (Ikibuki)

11. The time of embu (kata performance)




About Embu-Line

An embu-line is the fixed direction and angles of the body when you perform kata or when you attack, defend and turn the body.

There are 8 Basic Directions

Front and Back, Left and Right, Oblique of Front, Back, Left and Right

For performing kata, embu-line has to be structured in these eight directions in a fixed order and you have to perform the prescribed technique from a prescribed standing positition on this line. Each kata has a different embu-line.




The Method of Practice and Points to Pay Attention

When you perform kata, the most important thing is your mental attitude. Kata is not a play. You have to perform it seriously. It is easy to remember the order of kata, but the essence is not only to have performed the kata, but how you acted. For that reason, you have to practice the basics, such as the standing position, how to defend, how to thrust, and how to kick every day.

When you remember the order of kata, you have to practice the used techniques in kata individually and repeatedly, then you can connect the techniques you practice. When you are able to do this basic practice, you have to think of the technique as kata and not the individual techniques. You have to pay attention to how long it takes, strength, and speed, so that you can move and turn the body without waste.

The embu-line is fixed. You start from the starting point and come back to the starting point. One way to practice is to put a mark on the starting point when you act.

There is no end to the practice of kata. Even though a person who has a high dan performs, the acts are never perfect. The practice is unlimited because kata is for improving yourself mentally and physically. Yet the performance has to be improved in different ways with each step as a beginner, whether you have kyu [colored belt level] or dan (black belt level), although you are performing the same kata. Knowing a difficult kata does not mean you have a high dan.


The Most Important Things Are:

1. How to Bow

2. The Posture

3. The Placement of the Eyes

4. Kiai (Shout), Kihaku (projection of spirit)




Heian (Shodan):

"Peaceful Mind Beginning Step form"

"Heavenly Peace"

A kata taken from the Japanese Shotokan style and modified for use in Karate Jutsu. It is the first of a series of 5 Heian kata practised in the Shotokan style. Shotokan is a Japanese style derived from the Okinawan Shorin-Ryu style by Gichin Funakoshi. The original Shorin-Ryu kata were the Pinan series kata, which were modified by Funakoshi to become the Heian series of kata, now practised by Shotokan.

 

gekisai ichiGeki Sai Dai Ichi:

"Attack, crush, destroy, demolish #1"

This is an Okinawan Goju Ryu Kata developed by Chojun Miyagi in 1940 as a form of physical exercise for high school boys and to help popularize Goju-Ryu among the public of Okinawa. even though these Kata were designed primarily as a form of exercise, Miyagi Sensei included his understanding of combat as part of their makeup. Variations are also practiced within other styles.

gekisai niGeki Sai Dai Ni:

"Attack, crush, destroy, demolish #2"

This is an Okinawan Goju Ryu Kata developed by Chojun Miyagi. The Gekisai Kata are easier to learn and perform, and contain dynamic techniques which are more attractive to young people. Variations are also practiced within other styles.

saifaSaifa:

"Crush, tear, shatter"

This is an Okinawan Goju Ryu Kata which Kanryo Higaonna adopted from the Chinese martial arts he studied. It is the first of the classical combative Kata taught in Goju-Ryu. Goju-Ryu's Kata origins come from the martial arts taught in the Fuzhou area of southern China, largely Crane and Xingyi/Baqua as well as other internal and external martial arts. Kanryo Higaonna Sensei was taught this Kata, along with the other Kata of Goju-Ryu, while he studied in China from 1863-1881 under the direction of RuRuKo (Xie Zhongxiang in Chinese) and others. Variations are also practiced within other styles.

Naifunchin:

"Fight within boundary"

This is a Shorin Ryu Kata (Naihanchi Sho) part of a series of 3 kata. Also used as the first of a series of 3 kata in Shotokan under the name of Tekki Shodan. (Iron Horse)

seiinchinSeiyunchin:

"Conquer over a distance"

"To draw/suck/pull in and battle"

"Marching/Conquer far quietly"

"Control, suppress and pull"

"To pull off balance and fight"

This is an Okinawan Goju Ryu Kata which Kanryo Higaonna adopted from the Chinese martial arts he studied. The name Seiyunchin implies the use of techniques to off balance, throw and grapple. Seiyunchin contains close-quartered striking, sweeps, take-downs and throws. Though the Kata itself is void of kicks, many practitioners make the grave mistake by missing the opportunity to apply any leg technique. Variations are also practiced within other styles.

shisochinShisochin:

"Conquer 4 directions"

"Four gated battle"

"Four direction battle"

"To defeat attacks from four sides"

This is an Okinawan Goju Ryu Kata which Kanryo Higaonna adopted from the Chinese martial arts he studied. The third kanji is the same found in Sanchin and Seiyunchin, which translates as "battle" or "conflict". This lends to a deeper definition of its meaning. The idea of four directions can come from the performance of the four shotei in four directions. It can also represent the four elements represented in Chinese medicine (Acupuncture is one) of Wood, Fire, Metal and Water with man representing Earth. Variations are also practiced within other styles.

sanseiruSanseru:

"Thirty Six Hands"

This is an Okinawan Goju Ryu Kata which Kanryo Higaonna adopted from the Chinese martial arts he studied. A realistic explanation of this and the other numerically named Kata is that they refer to a systematic method and understanding of certain groupings of vital acupressure points. It is this science that the martial arts was based upon and developed. Variations are also practiced within other styles.

seipaiSepai:

"Eighteen Hands"

This is an Okinawan Goju Ryu Kata which Kanryo Higaonna adopted from the Chinese martial arts he studied. The most apparent and most meaningful in the naming of Sepai is again from the martial arts development and the use of attacking pressure points. 18 is one half of 36 suggesting that perhaps an alternative set of attacks and defenses of preferred techniques and strategies from the original Sanseru 36. Variations are also practiced within other styles.

seisanSeisan:

"Thirteen Hands"

This is an Okinawan Goju Ryu Kata which Kanryo Higaonna adopted from the Chinese martial arts he studied. Seisan is believed to be the oldest of all Okinawan Goju-Ryu Kata. There is a version of Seisan practiced in the Shorin schools, but in comparison, the Goju-Ryu version is longer and much more complex. Variations are also practiced within other styles.

kururunfaKururunfa:

"Forever peacefulness-stops-shatter"

"To remain still, then quickly attack and destroy"

"Holding ground"

"Armageddon"

"Silence before the storm"

This is an Okinawan Goju Ryu Kata which Kanryo Higaonna adopted from the Chinese martial arts he studied. Kururunfa epitomizes the ideals of Go-"hard and Ju-"soft". Stance transitions are quick and explosive while the hands techniques are employed using "muchimi" or a heavy, sticky movement. As in the other kata of Goju-Ryu, it is quite evident that grappling and close-quartered fighting is the favored fighting style. Variations are also practiced within other styles.

suparinpeiSuparinpei:

"One Hundred and Eight Hands"

This is an Okinawan Goju Ryu Kata which Kanryo Higaonna adopted from the Chinese martial arts he studied. Suparinpei is the most advanced Kata in Goju-Ryu. It contains the greatest number of techniques and variations. Suparinpei is deceptive in that it appears simple in execution but when combined with transitions and changing tempos, it is only surpassed by Sanchin in technical difficulty and understanding. Variations are also practiced within other styles.

suparinpeiSanchin:

"Three Battles/Conflicts"

One of two "heishu " Kata of Goju-Ryu, Sanchin is probably the most misunderstood Kata in all of Karate. In contrast, it is probably the single most valuable training exercise in Goju-Ryu. Sanchin has such aspects as deep, diaphragmatic breathing found in many internal arts as well as external attributes like mechanical alignment and muscular strength. Sanchin translates as "3 Battles" or "3 Conflicts". This has many meanings. First it refers to the struggle to control the body under physical fatigue. With fatigue the mind begins to lose focus and thus the spirit begins to diminish as well. Therefore Sanchin develops discipline, determination, focus, perseverance and other mental attributes. The Chinese refer to this as Shen (spirit), Shin (mind) and Li (body).


WEAPONS KATA (KOBUJUTSU):

Bo Dai Ichi:

Bo Dai Ni:

Nunchaku Dai Ichi:

Nunchaku Dai NI:

Tonfa Dai Ichi:

Tonfa Dai Ni:

Sai: